Installing Cement Backerboard for Tile in a Shower

by Roger

Installing cement backerboard is one of the more popular choices for a shower wall substrate. Cement backerboards include Hardiebacker, Durock, Fiberboard, wonderboard, and similar products. These materials bridge the gap between expense and effectiveness. When installed properly they will give you many, many years of durable shower construction.

The advantage of cement backerboards is that, while not waterproof, they are dimensionally stable when wet. That just means that when they get wet they do not swell up. Any swelling behind tile is a bad thing. It will lead to cracking grout, tile, and all sorts of bad things.

Waterproofing your studs

To install the backerboard you must have a vapor barrier between it and the wooden wall studs. While the backerboard will not swell when wet, your wall studs will. You must prevent any moisture from reaching them. The preferred material for a vapor barrier would be 4 mil or thicker plastic sheeting which can be purchased at places like Home Depot or any hardware store. You can also use tar paper or roofing paper, the thick black paper used under shingles. Although I personally do not use that, it is an acceptable barrier.

Starting with your bare wall studs on your shower walls simply take your plastic sheeting and staple it to the wall studs completely covering the entire surface which will be inside your shower. You can also use silicone instead of staples to adhere it to the studs. Make sure you overlap all the edges. Just hang it all up there like you’re hanging wallpaper. You want it covering the framing enough that if you were to spray the walls with a hose the wall studs and framing would not get wet.

At the bottom of the barrier you will want it to overlap on the shower side of the tub or shower base. That is you want it so that any water that runs down the plastic sheeting will roll off into the tub rather than behind the tub. Overlap the lip of the tub or base and silicone the back of the barrier to keep it in place.

Installing the backerboard

Now for the backerboard. Lay out your backerboards for the best fit on the walls. They can go up vertically or horizontally, it makes no difference. With a regular tub surround with a five foot back wall it is usually easier to use two horizontal sheets along the back wall and one vertical on each of the sides. (This assumes 3 X 5 foot backerboard sheets.)

All backerboards are cut by scoring and snapping. You do not need a saw for them. While there are special scoring tools specifically for this you can easily do it with a regular utility knife. While all these backerboards are essentially identical in their effectiveness as a substrate, some are more easily cut. Durock, in my opinion, is the most difficult. I personally prefer hardiebacker or fiberboard. Make sure you check the website for whichever you choose for specific instructions.

To fasten the backerboard to the framing you have a couple of choices. A lot of professionals simply use galvanized roofing nails. While this is perfectly acceptable, I prefer screws over nails when possible. Hardi makes specific screws for their backerboard which can also be used for all backerboards. These are manufactured with ribs beneath the head of the screw which help it cut into the backerboard and countersink so the head is flush. If your local big box or hardware store carries them, they will be in the tile section. You can also use just about any type of corrosion resistant screw. Anything that can be used for an outside deck can be used for your backerboard.

Fasten your backerboard to your shower framing with a screw or nail about every 8 – 12 inches. I would also suggest using a straight-edge along your wall while doing this so that you can shim out any areas where the wall studs may not be straight. The flatter your backerboard is installed, the easier your tile installation will be. Take your time, the beer isn’t going anywhere.

Allow for movement!

You do not want to butt the backerboards against one another. You need to leave a small gap at every change of plane. That includes corners, walls to ceilings, and walls to tubs or floors. There needs to be room for expansion and contraction.

Wood moves – always. It’s just a fact of life. The secret to dealing with the movement is to ensure the movement will not interfere with the tile. Leaving this small gap will allow for movement of the sheets enough so that they do not force against one another and push out. While the backerboard itself is very stable, you are still attaching it to wood.

If you have a tub or shower base you will also want to stop the backerboard about 1/8 inch above the lip. You do not want to run the board over the edge of the lip because it will cause the backerboard to bow out and your wall will not be flat. It will also allow the tub or shower base to move a bit – it’s attached to the wooden studs as well. Tubs also move when they are filled with water. You need to allow for that movement.

I usually leave about a 1/16 to 1/8 inch gap between the sheets of backerboard. This allows for thinset to lock into the entire thickness of your backerboard when you tape and mud your seams. We’ll cover that part in a minute.

Don’t allow for movement! (Confused yet?)

If your shower framing is such that you cannot place the edges of all the backerboards directly over a stud you will need to add more studs. You may do this with regular 2 X 4’s screwed to the present framing vertically or horizontally as needed. You must make sure that every edge of the backerboard is supported so if the wall is pushed or leaned on in that spot it does not move. You want solid walls.

Final step

The last thing you must do is mud and tape your seams. Similar to regular drywall all of your in-plane  joints must be taped. To do this you just use regular thinset and alkali-resistant fiberglass mesh tape. You can find the tape in the tile section – it’s similar to regular fiberglass drywall tape, but it specifically manufactured to be alkali resistant. Make sure it is alkali-resistant because your thinset contains alkali which will gradually erode regular tape thus defeating the purpose.

There are two ways to address the corners. The industry standard, and the way you should do it, is to tape and mud the corner joint as well. Most backerboard manufacturers recommend this, as do the handbook standards. I only do that about half the time – I’m a rebel like that. 8)

*The other half of the time I only tape and mud the in-plane joints – the gaps in the same wall, not the corners. With the corners I fill the gap with silicone. I do this to allow the different planes of the walls to move in different directions, which they will do whether you like it or not. Allowing this movement in the substrate compensates for excess stress in certain applications. This is something that I do, it is not industry standard and you will likely not find anyone else recommending doing this. So when you get the conflicting information about this – that’s why. :D

Fill all the gaps in your seams with thinset (you left gaps there, right?) then embed the tape into it. Then go over the tape with more thinset to smooth everything out. This will lock everything together and give you a continuous, solid substrate for your tile. That’s what you’re looking for.

When properly installed cement backerboards will create a rock solid, extremely durable substrate for your tile installation. Taking time and care to solidify what is behind or beneath your tile is the only way to guarantee a lasting installation. Your tile is only as durable as what it is installed upon.

As always if you have any questions at all please feel free to leave a comment.

Hardiebacker Website

Durock Website

Need More Information?

I now have manuals describing the complete process for you from bare wall studs all the way up to a completely waterproof shower substrate for your tile. If you are tiling your walls and floor you can find that one here: Waterproof shower floor and wall manual.

If you have a tub or pre-formed shower base and are only tiling the walls you can find that one here: Waterproof shower walls manual.

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Jeronimus

Hello Roger.
Great site you got here
hopefully an easy question: The 1/8 opening between the shower pan and the bottom backerboard…. Do these need
To be taped and filled also? (Or silicone).

Thanks, jeronimus

Reply

Christi

Hi Roger,
I purchased three books and I have information overload now. Insert “Head is about to explode” emoji. My remodel is: Kohler Archer tub with flange, Hardiebacker, then Laticrete Hydrobarrier with Laticrete 6″ tape. I read instructions indicating that I should install the Hardie overlapping the tub flange so that the bottom of the Hardie is 1/4″ above the tub deck. This would require at least 1/4″ shimming, or sistering studs, etc. I also saw that most remodels are done with the Hardie hovering above the top of the tub flange and then Laticrete 6″ wide mesh tape is hung off the bottom of the Hardie so that it flows into the tub area. Reason best explained for the second type of install is so that the transition between old drywall and new isn’t as bad with height difference because the 1/4″ shimming won’t be needed. So, are either methods acceptable so long as they are done right? or is one better than the other? Which one do you recommend or do you use both methods depending on the situations? I ask because I read both methods on your website.
Thank you ahead of time for the enlightenment.

Reply

Erick

Hi Roger,

Thanks so much for this amazing write-up! Super helpful!

I recently discovered a very long horizontal crack that runs the length of my bathroom shower stall. The crack is about 1-1.5mm wide, and runs horizontally about 10 inches from the floor. Interestingly, the crack isn’t in the grout, between the tiles, but actually runs through the tiles themselves. The crack also extends through the drywall on the other side of the shower stall for another couple inches.

I’ve attached a photo that shows the damage, and here are some more images: https://goo.gl/photos/fBWeQhTVV96ZTqpT7

The house was built only 5 years ago. Should I be worried? Could this just be the result of “normal” house settling? Based on your article here, I wonder if the developer didn’t properly seal the gaps between the backing boards underneath? I’m also not sure if they used greenboards or cement boards.

Can I just use some silicone caulk to seal up this crack, or do I need more drastic repairs?

Thank you!!

Reply

J walls

Roger,
Regarding taping of Hardi-to-Gyp joints (outside of a shower)———

Several posts indicate that you can successfully tape these joints with ARM tape and your choice of either thinset or joint compound (and you can even tile on top of gyp board with thinset).

But, in the “Final Step” of this article, it says to use ARM tape and thinset for taping Hardi-to-Hardi because regular tape (paper, I assume) and thinset are a bad combination because the alkaline thinset will “gradually erode” the paper tape (so use ARM tape instead of paper tape).

So, is this concern (alkaline erosion of paper) not also applicable to
1) a thinset & ARM taped Hardi-to-gyp board (paper faced) joint?
2) and also the gyp board paper face that’s tiled using thinset?
3) i.e. will the thinset not gradually erode away the paper face on the gyp board?

Reply

Roger

Hi Erick,

I will say you’ll need more drastic repairs than silicone. Is this in a basement shower?

Reply

Adam

I put up my vapor barrier before realizing I would need to shim out my studs (to bring the cement board even with drywall and to bring the studs even with each other; it’s an old house). I’ve used compressed cardboard shims to shim out the cement board, but the shims are between the cement board and the vapor barrier.

This is a problem, isn’t it. To correct it, I would need to pull down the cement board, the shims, and the vapor barrier, shim the studs, and reinstall the vapor barrier over the shims. I want you to tell me this isn’t necessary, but I feel like you’re going to tell me that it is (because moisture will get to the cardboard).

Reply

Roger

Hi Adam,

Unfortunately you already know what I’m gonna tell you. :D Yes, it needs to be removed and the shims placed behind the barrier.

Reply

Jason

Hi Roger,

Thanks for this site. It’s very informative. I have done demo on my washroom/shower pan and run into issues. The shower pan rests 5/8″ from the studs. The finished wall is 3/8″ plywood(sound proofing i guess) under 5/8″ drywall so my shower pan is actually recessed into the wall by 3/8″ The shower pan has a vertical lip off of the horizontal that the screws go into that is 1/4″ thick so this is how the original install was able to be true-ish.

I was going to use a product called densshield for the membrane and 12×24″ tile. Off of the studs if I use regular 5/8″ drywall then 1/2″ densshield I have this problem with the shower pan lip being 1/4″ pushing the tiles out. I read above that you usually stop 1/8″ above this vertical lip.

1) Do I need to provide structual support for the tile over this lip for the tile and for the grout? This lip for me is 1 1/2″. I’m picturing pushing endless grout in as it fills the cavity. Also, I can put a good large section of 5/8″ denshield behind the shower pan, is this sufficent enough water proofing? Silicone the back of the pan to this piece.

2) Densshield install instructions calls for siliconing the lip to the pan, different product maybe, but what are your concerns with trapping water like you mentioned about.

3) If I did it this way, I read somewhere 1/2″ thinset trowel is best. I assume the thinset doesn’t change its depth much when the tile is pushed on. Assuming it’s still 1/2″ in depth, I have 5/8 drywall + 1/2 denshield + 1/2 thinset + 1/4 tile I have approx 1 7/8″ depth off the studs. My finished wall is 1″ off the studs. What is the best way to finish such a large variance of 7/8″ that would include showing part of the densshield, thinset and tile. If I have to add 1/4 shim for the shower lip this is variance is even greater.

4) I have a similar problem on the other side. 5/8 drywall x2 off the studs. Shower pan 5/8″ off studs. If I stop short of vertical I’m 5/8 drywall + 1/2 denshield + 1/2 thinset + 1/4 tile for the same depth as above of 1 7/8″ off studs when the finished wall is 1 1/4″. A variance of 5/8″

I went to home depot and they weren’t much help :-(

Reply

Roger

Hi Jason,

1. No, the tile will just hang there. You need to silicone the back of the densshield to the front of the pan lip.
2. That is only an issue when the tile-pan junction is siliconed. There will always be water between the tile and substrate, there should not be any behind the substrate.
3. A 1/2″ x 1/2″ trowel will leave a 1/4″ bed of thinset behind your tile. You will need something to cover that edge, a stone ‘pencil rail’ works well.
4. Same answer. If you can find a schluter edging thick enough you can use one of those as well.

Home depot is never any help. :D

Reply

Bryan Burkhalter

Great site! Ok, I just want to be 100% certain I’m understanding my install plan correctly. I’m doing a tile surround in my tub/shower. Vapor barrier, check. 1) barrier to overlap the 1″ tub lip about 1/8th inch? 2) 1/2 inch hardie board overlaps the 1″ tub lip down to about 1/8th inch from the next sorta lip area? 3) silicone the 1/8 inch space left, as well as the 2 corners in the shower where I have left a small gap for expansion.

Lastly, I had a contractor set the tub. He didnt run the screws through the lip, but rather on top with the head of the screw sorts pinning the tub to the studs. Thoughts? Should i redo this with the screws through the 1″ lip?

Thanks!!
V/r
Bryan

Reply

Roger

Hi Bryan,

I normally run the barrier down almost to the tub. You need to silicone the BACK of the barrier to the FACE of the tub lip to ensure no water runs up behind your barrier. You do not silicone the gap at the bottom of the backer, this would trap water running down the face of the barrier. Everything else sounds good.

The screws get put over the lip about half the time, it eliminates the possibility of cracking the lip when driving the screws. It works just fine, no need to change it.

Reply

Jean

The durock went up to the shower ceiling.
My guy used tape and joint compound eight inches from the ceiling down on it.
Then unprimed, used redgard about four inches. It’s going to be tiled up to the ceiling. Please advise what’s the best solution to fix this.

Reply

Roger

Hi Jean,

I don’t understand what you mean by ‘then unprimed, used redgard about four inches’?

Reply

Tom

Me and my wife love your website. We were wondering if it is OK to put cement screws in bottom 6 inches of cement board for dry pack shower pan that will be water proofed with redgard.
Thank you

Reply

Roger

Hi Tom (and Tom’s wife…),

Yes, you can put them as low as you want. They won’t interfere with anything.

Reply

Marty

I am installing a shower, I used a vapor barrier and backer board. I have purchased a durock shower system. it comes with a rubber membrane, to go over the backer board, am I ok in doing it this way?

Reply

Roger

Hi Marty,

Yes, you’re fine.

Reply

Marty

Roger,
I am using slate for my shower walls, do you have any recommendations as to installing it? Should I seal it before I grout it, because of the porous tiles and what type of thin set should I use?

Reply

Roger

Hi Marty,

Yes you should seal it. Before and after grout. Use a good modified thinset, I like laticrete 254 or mapei ultraflex 2.

Reply

Marty

Roger,
Thanks for your help, but I have one more question about the grouting,
I used the 511 impregnating sealer, it says that it can be used as a grout release, I am installing slate in my shower, it is very porous, should I use a grout release as well before I grout it?

Reply

Roger

Hi Marty,

Absolutely. Use as much of it as you can – slate SUCKS to grout. :D

Reply

Kathy

Sorry… computer foul up… it was an ID-10-T operator error.
This is a continuation of a previous email concerning my daughter’s MA shower remodel that I accidentally submitted before completing. Duh!

To continue my questions: plumber notched studs at floor level to allow shower base to be recessed slightly and have backer board come down over shower base flanges. 1) How far over those flanges should backer board hang? 2) if she’s using redgard to waterproof should she coat the lower edge of backerboard? 3) should the flange be coated? 3) if no redgard coating as in 2 & 3, would a bead of silicone be needed at base of backer board to prevent water from wicking up into cement board? 4) last question, I promise… modified or unmodified thinset to adhere tile to redgard?

Thanks for all the help,
Kathy

Reply

Roger

Hi Kathy,

1. To within about 1/4″ of the horizontal portion of the tub.
2. Yes, then fill with silicone.
3. Yes.
4. Modified.

Reply

Veronica

I am having my tub converted to a shower and I would like to know if using Durock ONLY is good enough? The contractor stated he doesn’t put a vapor barrier, just the Durock and then we’re going to tile over it..I’m paranoid about any water getting behind my walls; however, he has great references, documents and pictures of his work and over 13 years of experience..

Reply

Roger

Hi Veronica,

You’re paying for it, right? You NEED a barrier of some sort, either behind the backer or a topical membrane over it. Durock IS NOT waterproof.

Anyone can make things look good and take a picture of it right after they’re done. Does he have any pictures of the wall BEHIND those showers after they’ve been used ten years and the new owners want new tile? I do…

DEMAND that it be done correctly. It’s your home that is important, not his damn ego…

Reply

Mike

Love the web site and the helpful information. We’re on the home stretch now! I have followed all your instructions and I’m using Regard on the shower side of the backer board for my vapor barrier. I got a little confused as to where to end the backer board at the pan’s top mud layer (which is next, after the lath is installed to the curbs). Do I put the backer board down to the liner, so that the top mud bed covers the end of the backer board; then Regard 6″ out on the top mud bed? Or do I stop the backer 1/16″ above the top mud bed and no Redgard on the top mud bed at all? Thanks for all the help. You Rock!!

Mike

Reply

Roger

Hi Mike,

You can actually do it either way. It’s best with the gap.

Reply

Joe

I have my backer board installed with a gap to the top of the mud bed (varies in size, but up to 1/2″ in spots) and planned to redgard just the walls. Should I be taping the wall-to-floor joint and filling with thinset? Or leave it “uncoupled”? If I don’t tape this joint, is there any benefit to applying redgard to the base and curb? There is of course a continuous membrane underneath the mud.
Love your site, real practical and easy to flow guidance. Thanks!

Reply

Roger

Hi Joe,

Just leave it as it is. There is no advantage to using redgard on the base and curb with a membrane already beneath them, it can actually create problems.

Reply

Murray

Hi Roger,

I have the topical waterproofing manual and have read it cover to cover! Cement board is up and I am getting ready to silicone the corners and tape the seams- do I need to wet or mist the cement board before using thinset in the seams? And if there are some gaps near the corners that are bigger (say 1/2″ or so) should those be filled with thinset or silicone? Thanks in advance!!

Reply

Roger

Hi Murray,

It always helps to mist the backer first, it will suck the moisture out of your thinset very quickly. If there are gaps that large fill them with thinset.

Reply

J walls

Roger,
Wont’ that crack if you fill the corner gap with thinset?
It eliminates the expansion function of the silicone as described in your books.
Is this a case of just no really good solution?

Reply

Roger

Likely, but that’s a large enough gap to contain the pressure it will create. And yes, no good solution. :D

Reply

Jill

Hi Roger,
First, you are awesome! Second, I hope I’m not wasting your time with my questions. Haven’t come across any posts yet.
I have torn out my walls to the studs. The tub’s back wall and end wall (away from the faucets) are on exterior walls. I have insulated those walls. The other wall will be backed up to a linen closet. I already have some plastic sheeting that is 2 mil. Can I double it before stapling it to the walls if I make sure to get it tight?
And, if I start my 1/2″ cement board above the lip of the tub, with a gap!! what about the space/walls under the tub? Do I cover that area with anything?

Reply

Roger

Hi Jill,

You are not wasting my time, beer does that for me. :D

Yes, you can double your plastic sheeting. No, you don’t need to cover that area with anything. You can if you want to, though.

Reply

Eric S

Hi Roger,
Can I bevel cut (45°) the bottom edge of the Hardie backer where it comes down to meet the top of the of the shower lip? That way I’m not on top of the lip (with the 1/8″ gap and silicon bead in between), and I would also get some benefit of a slight overhang. I’m installing a corner shower with curved glass doors and the tolerances for the top support rail don’t have a lot of wiggle room (I can’t bring the tiled walls I to to shower area too far). Great site, thank you.

Reply

Roger

Hi Eric,

Yes you can. It’s a pain in the ass, but that will work just fine.

Reply

Eric S

Ended up not cutting a 45° bevel; it was going to be a pain in the rear! (Although it was a good theory…)
Thank you for your reply.

Reply

Stephen

I am only going to be adding a tub surround, and the tub already has a several inch lip around it (fiberglass tub). How do I go about leaving this plastic overlap you mention? I’m thinking that the backer board would have to rest atop the overlapped plastic, but the plastic not extend far enough to interfere with the grout/caulk at the bottom. Maybe this is a stupid question and maybe I’m not understanding or explaining my question properly.

Reply

Roger

Hi Stephen,

You are correct. I normally run it all the way to the tub and silicone it there, leaving about 1/2″ for the backer to sit atop.

Reply

Mike

First, thank you for this website and the vast amount of information. I understand the concept of waterproofing and installing the backerboard. If the vapor barrier is intended to drain water back into the tub, wouldn’t the caulk at the tile/tub junction block that drainage? I assume the gap between the tub and the tile is meant to be caulked? Sometimes the simplest of things are the most perplexing. Am I nuts for asking this?

Reply

Roger

Hi Mike,

No, you are absolutely not nuts for asking, the handbook committee is nuts for not making it clear. :D You need weep holes.

Reply

Mike

Ah huh. So in other words, I would be weeping because I didn’t have weep holes for my tile to weep. Gotcha. :lol2:

Reply

Ted

Hi Roger,

Maybe you can help me out. I recently gutted my bathroom and removed the 1950s plaster board walls but left the ceiling. I am installing a new tub and plan on using wonder board for the tile. The bathroom originally had roughly 1″ thick walls. In order for window and door jambs to meet flush with the new walls, I am planning a furring the walls 1/2″ and then use 1/2″ drywall in the dry areas and 7/16″ wonderboard around the tub area. With furring out the tub walls 1/2″, this will create a 3/8″ horizontal gap between the tub flange and wonder board when the wonderboard overlaps the tub flange. so a few questions are:

1.) Is a 3/8″ horizontal gap between the wonderboard and tub flange ok?

2.) If the horizontal gap is ok between the wonderboard and tub flange, how could i waterproof this area? Run plastic sheeting between the backboard and furring strips and then attach bottom of sheeting between furring strips and tub with caulk? Or
Use red guard on the wonderboard and then caulk the 3/8″ horizontal gap between the backside of the wonderboard and the front of the tub flange?

3.) I also want to add a niche in the bathtub wall. If I do this should I use red guard on the backboard and caulk the 3/8″ gap instead of using sheeting behind the wonderboard?

Sorry about the long written description but I hope it conveys my dilemma. Attached is a picture of my dilemma which might help out. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Reply

Roger

Hi Ted,

The easiest solution for that gap is to get some 1/2″ backer rod and fill that gap, then to waterproof it just paint redgard over the backer rod.
You can do it either way (the niche) with that method.

Reply

Ted

Thank you for the quick reply Roger. When using the red guard, would I cover from the backer board down, and then over the backer rod, and then coat the tub flange? If so, how high off the tub should I install the wonder board?

Reply

Roger

Yes, I usually go at least an inch onto the flange. I normally only leave it about 1/8″ or so. Maybe a little more depending on what size backer rod I happen to have in the truck. :D

Reply

Ted

Thanks Roger

Reply

Dom

Should waterproofing membrane such as RedGard be used before or after taping the seams? My gut says after to ensure everything is sealed uniformly but wasn’t sure if it should be done in three steps (apply membrane & let dry, tape seams & let dry, apply membrane on seams) or all at once. All at once seems to make more sense. Thanks.

Reply

Roger

Hi Dom,

Tape and mud first, then apply the membrane.

Reply

Austin

Recently, I installed a plastic vapor barrier to protect the wood framing in a new basement bathroom, and my inspector didn’t like it. It is not explicitly called for in any manufacturers’ installation instructions for cement board that I could find, and to him, that meant it shouldn’t be done according to code.

He says it causes mold to grow between the backer board and the barrier, which seems to be confirmed by contractors on youtube who disassemble decades-old showers during remodel projects, but my research wasn’t that extensive. What is your opinion of this whole issue?

PS I ended up taking the cement board down and removing the barrier, just so I could move on with the project

Reply

Roger

Hi Austin,

I suppose his code does not require waterproofing then? At all? Because cement board isn’t waterproof. Given enough time mold COULD form there, and I have seen it, but it’s ALWAYS in conjunction with something else done incorrectly which allowed water to remain stagnant behind the backer and not drain. If done correctly the water will drain after every use. If water is moving behind the wall (draining) mold can not grow because the spores will be washed down with it.

Reply

Marcos miranda

I have a problem my tile guys went all the way to the tub with the backer board and the curve is ridiculous. They are saying it’s the framing but I don’t believe it. What to do

Reply

Roger

Hi Marcos,

The substrate should be flat, no matter the state of the framing. It is the tile guys’ job to create a flat substrate for the tile if it is not new construction. They likely went over the flange with the backer, it either needs to stop shy of the flange or be shimmed out so it can go over the flange and remain flat.

Reply

Rescue me...

Thank you so much….I’m a handy, but now shower-installation-handy-woman following the shower rebuild and with your site and explanations, I’m feeling much more informed and secure with the processes without being the worried homeowner pest :-P

Reply

Axel

Roger,

If I elect to thin-set my backerboard corners, do I have to grout my tile corners or can i still caulk them even though the backerboard is thin-set :?:

Reply

Roger

Hi Axel,

I answered this yesterday, didn’t I? :D Still caulk them because tile expands and contracts also.

Reply

Axel

Roger,

Yes, most likely. :bonk: I suspect the post reset and it was blank the next time I checked. Thus I never saw your response. Thank you for responding again. 8)

This may be nick picky, but when setting the corner tiles does it matter which tile goes behind and which one goes in front?

Reply

Roger

Nope, doesn’t matter. I usually do the back wall first, then the side walls. But you can do it either way.

Reply

Charlie

If I install a vapor barrier is it necessary to use Redguard? Is there any reason not to use both a vapor barrier and Redguard

Reply

Roger

Hi Charlie,

If you use a vapor barrier you don’t need redgard, if you use redgard don’t use a vapor barrier. Anything trapped between the two barriers can not dissipate and will begin to grow mold. You want one or the other, never both.

Reply

Marcos miranda

My tile guys only put the red paint on the seams and over the screws is that enough?

Reply

Roger

NO! It is not.

Reply

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